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The aim of this series is to provide a forum for the whole range of philosophical research on poverty, poverty research and poverty alleviation (all three broadly construed). This series is neither restricted to a certain understanding of poverty (while most existing research focuses on global, absolute poverty), nor does it follow a certain approach within philosophy – while most of the existing literature falls within the post-Ralwsian liberal camp within political philosophy. It is also not restricted to normative questions of ethics or justice or human rights. Most philosophical work on poverty tries to answer such questions – e.g. in what respect poverty is unjust? What rich people or states owe the poor? Or what a just global order should look like – and they will also have a prominent place in this series, but they are certainly not the only philosophical questions we can find in relation to poverty, in particular not if we widen the spectrum and also interrogate how poverty is conceptualised, researched and measured, and how it is tackled or alleviated through different policies, development aid or social services. This series is also open to these questions and wants to broaden the philosophical discourse on poverty by also including the disciplines of philosophy of science, epistemology and also history of philosophy.

This series will cover high quality and thoroughly drafted edited volumes and research monographs. All books in the series will undergo rigorous peer review, and it is expected that they should excel in quality, novelty and actuality. Both systematic as well as historical approaches are welcome. Possible topics (this list is not exclusive) include: global and social justice and poverty; the conceptualisation of poverty; ethical issues in poverty alleviation; philosophical interrogations of poverty policies, social services and development aid; poverty in the history of philosophy; the philosophy of “poverty science” and research; issues of intersectionality and the relation of poverty to gender, age, race and disability; feminist, critical, radical and postcolonial perspectives on poverty, poverty research and alleviation.